Command+Edit Podcast

The post-production podcast that goes beyond the desk

editors

Premiere Pro Tips That'll Save You Hours : Episode 81

Nick Montgomery1 Comment
CmdEdit_BlogImage_Ep81.jpg

Press play above or download the episode as an MP3.

A WORD FROM OUR SPONSORS

This episode is brought to you by Studio Network Solutions and their EVO Shared Storage unit. Every EVO includes their easy to use media management software for organizing, tagging, and finding your media across all of your storage devices—even external, local, and cloud services.

For more info check out studionetworksolutions.com/commandedit.

ON WITH THE SHOW

Nick and Josh are BACK!

In this episode the guys give a ton of useful, time-saving Adobe Premiere Pro tips that you may never have heard before.

SOME TIPS THAT WE COVER:

  • Quickly soloing/muting tracks
  • Update colors of clips in bins onto timeline
  • PDF Viewer Plugin
  • Trim to Playhead
  • New Search Bin Query
  • See how often a clip is used and where it’s used across a project
  • Pancake Timeline Wacom Macro Hack
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Song used in this episode was Fountain of Youth by Stephen Keech on Soundstripe.

Get unlimited royalty-free stock music from Soundstripe: http://soundstripe.grsm.io/joshshort 

Use the code COMMANDEDIT for 10% off!

OTHER EPISODES YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO

Editing in Japan and Across the Globe with Norman Hollyn : Episode 75

Nick MontgomeryComment
Command Edit Podcast interview with Norman Hollyn japan

A WORD FROM OUR SPONSORS

This episode is brought to you by Studio Network Solutions and their EVO Shared Storage unit. Every EVO includes their easy to use media management software for organizing, tagging, and finding your media across all of your storage devices—even external, local, and cloud services.

For more info check out studionetworksolutions.com/commandedit.

ON WITH THE SHOW

Our guest today is none other than Norman Hollyn. Norman is a media expert. He is, of course, an editor as well as a professor of Cinematic Arts at USC and travels all around the world as an editing educator.

Norman and Josh discuss Norman’s time teaching abroad, different editing styles across the globe, trying to get emotions out of your audience and much more.

LINKS

Song used in this episode was Bouncy Castle by Niko Xidas.

Get unlimited royalty-free stock music from Soundstripe: http://soundstripe.grsm.io/joshshort

Use the code COMMANDEDIT for 10% off!

SOCIAL MEDIA

Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/CommandEdit

Join our Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/CommandEdit/

An Interview with Mae Manning : Episode 74

Nick MontgomeryComment
Command Edit Podcast Post Production Interview with Mae Manning

A WORD FROM OUR SPONSORS

SNS Studio Network Solutions SNS creates software and shared media storage SAN/NAS solutions for TV, film, and video editing professionals

This episode is brought to you by Studio Network Solutions and their EVO Shared Storage unit. Every EVO includes their easy to use media management software for organizing, tagging, and finding your media across all of your storage devices—even external, local, and cloud services.

For more info check out studionetworksolutions.com/commandedit.

ON WITH THE SHOW

Mae was bartending and raising a daughter in Atlanta when a producer approached her after seeing her music mashup projects that she continued to work on in her spare time.

Self-taught and self-propelled, after seeing a trailer for Zack Snyder's 300 she immediately vowed to become an editor.

She's a delightful and talented person to begin with but she's also a real-life example of what you should do if you're passionate about your work but have no doors open to you to the industry.

WATCH THIS

LINKS

Song used in this episode was Gatsby's Saloon by Matt Wigton

Get unlimited royalty-free stock music from Soundstripe: http://soundstripe.grsm.io/joshshort

Use the code COMMANDEDIT for 10% off!

SOCIAL MEDIA

Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/CommandEdit

Join our Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/CommandEdit/

The Force Awakens a New Hope (or Our Obligatory, Spoiler-Free Star Wars Episode) : Cmd+Edit 027

Nick MontgomeryComment
The Editors behind Star Wars A New Hope Episode 27 of Command Edit Podcast

*NOTE: THIS IS A SPOILER-FREE ZONE*

Check out videos and links below that were mentioned in this episode.

There's some kind of sci-fi movie coming out this week that's got everybody's attention. So we figured we should probably do something about Star Wars ourselves.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens launches this week, the long-awaited sequel to one of the biggest movie franchises of all time. And also one of the biggest underdog filmmaker stories ever.

The one that started it all, Star Wars: A New Hope, was an instant classic that solidified itself in cinema history. It's no surprise then that there are endless great stories about the production that continue to be told today.

Three of those wonderfully creative people were the original Star Wars editors: Paul Hirsch, Richard Chew and Marcia Lucas (does that last name sound familiar?). Yes, Marcia was also George Lucas' wife at the time of production. That Director-Editor relationship sounds eerily similar to another popular movie we discussed recently.

This is a fun, quick episode for you to digest where we discuss our first experiences with the Star Wars films growing up, our predictions for what Episode VII has in store (will Han Solo die??) as well as some fun facts about the original editors that you probably didn't know.

Let's face it, you probably didn't even know their names, right? But they've definitely been working on some movies very recently that you've seen. Find out which ones.

And may the force be with you!


VIDEOS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

  • The Japanese international trailer for Star Wars: The Force Awakens.
  • Star Wars Deleted Magic: This supercut of lost footage from Star Wars: A New Hope offers a glimpse into a lot of stuff off of the cutting room floor, behind-the-scenes footage and editor's notes on why some decisions were made during production. It's very cool to see what could have been for some landmark scenes. Marcia Lucas should be credited for many of the changes that made this film go from mediocre to legendary, including the big finale trench run scene on the Death Star which she practically saved
  • 2015 Movie Trailer Mashup: Sleepy Skunk has cut together an epic mashup of movie trailers from 2015. In fact, he's done one for each year for the past 5 years. Check out this one and then check out the rest on his channel.
  • Tarantino's Hateful Eight vs Disney: Tarantino got furious at Disney because they allegedly are pushing his upcoming 70mm movie The Hateful Eight out of the Cinerama Dome to extend the holiday run of Star Wars Episode VII. He went off on the Howard Stern Radio Show about it.

Things Directors Wish Editors Would Do

Nick MontgomeryComment
Things Directors Wish Editors Would Do

In last week's episode Josh and I talked about Things Editors Wish Directors Would Do to make their lives easier. Now we're turning the tables and asking the opposite: What do directors secretly wish editors would do differently?

We asked a handful of different directors to get ideas on what we as editors can do to make them happier, because isn't that what it's all about: making the director happy...well, that's what we say out loud anyways.

So here are some thoughts pulled from the minds of directors, those people who employ you to work on their projects, so that you may possibly understand a bit more about what goes on in the minds of these creatures.

Knowing where everything is, being able to pull up shots, have a system that works.

I guess in my experience I wish editors would keep better notes. I can't remember how many times when I said "What about that other shot" or "What about that other take in this series" and they're like "Yeah, I thought that too" and you're like "Good, can you bring it up?". And they take like ten minutes finding something.

Because they didn't keep proper notes you waste all this time as they try to find it. Significant nuisance.

The more detailed notes they have during intake, transcoding, and synching, the smoother the edit goes.

- Mike Cameron (Weekenders Present: Quitter)

Don't be afraid.

Perhaps one thing that comes to mind in general when looking for an editor is make sure the editor knows the source material very well, from framing to pacing and to my be afraid to make ballsy editing choices"

Sometimes editors take too long on a scene and they chip away on it to much, to the point of not knowing they are over thinking it. They're not to blame, it's because they are stuck in a dark room for hours on end making choices, which in return will get changed.

- Gabriel Carrer (The Demolisher, In the House of Flies)

Be willing to collaborate with the director

The editor is part of my creative team, and in turn I want them to collaborate, contribute and be creative. In doing so, they must know the script, know the story, know the film. They should make an effort (as I would to them) to talk about the film before they start cutting, to understand the creative direction of the film, and to trust their creative spark in the endeavour. I don't just want an "assembly cut," so to speak. Be an artist.

- Lyndon Horsfall (Dead Air, Synchronicity)

Forget the words "That's not possible"

I think working together to find compromises and hearing suggestions from both sides makes almost anything possible.

[My editor and I have] talked about his original intention for a scene and how he envisioned it. The reality of a low budget indie is that you sometimes don't have the time to make a scene match the director's vision completely on the day it's shot. So in editing, we've worked together, found middle ground, and experimented to make what's "not possible" with the footage look like it's possible.

- Tonya Dodds Sinasac (Producer on Red Spring)

*Technically I'm cheating by including Tonya on this list because she works more as a producer than a director. And her go-to editor is Jeff Sinasac, AKA her husband. But she has lots of experience in both production and post-production. And did you read her answer? Insightful, ain't it?

So there you go. Straight from the directors' mouths themselves, those are some tips on what can sometimes be expected of you in an Editor-Director relationship.

Got a tip of your own that we missed? Tweet it to @CommandEdit.

Let us know what you think of this episode

Things Editors Wish Directors Would Do While Filming : Cmd+Edit 011

Nick MontgomeryComment
Command Edit Podcast Episode 11 What Editors Want to say to directors

If you could tell the director to shoot something differently, what would you tell them?

There are many times when editors wish they could travel back in time to when filming was happening and advise the production crew on how they can make the edit go smoothly.

Whether it be "I wish they got a shot of this" or "Could they have cut a second later" or "Could they have gotten this angle instead?", there are many things that would make the editor's life a lot easier...but they often never occur to the director.

Why? Because they're filming as a director, not as an editor. They have a million things to be thinking about while shooting a scene, and not always is "How will this edit together?" one of those.

So educate them! Tell them what you as the editor needs to do your job the best you can and deliver a golden edit.

Here are some common things that we wish directors would keep in mind when on set. And the most important reason for them to do so is not to make you happy, but to make Mr. Future-Director happy when he/she sees their movie come together in the editing room.

Tweet us your own things that you wish directors would do to make the edit better. (@CommandEdit)

E-mail us if you enjoyed the show and let us know how we're doing. (commandeditpodcast@gmail.com)